Thoughts about Food: Milk

I sort of hate drinking milk.

That’s not true: I despise it.

As a kid, I didn’t do milk and cookies. I don’t like the flavor of milk. I don’t like the texture of milk. I’ve been brainwashed into thinking that milk will add extra pounds to my hips. Mind you, I will eat cheese of any variety like it’s going out of style, and I use milk in cooking and on cereal. I just don’t drink it.

As I was walking through Whole Foods a couple of weeks ago, trying out all sorts of little tidbits set out by the Evil Tempters they call “employees”, I ran into a guy in overalls who said, “You need some milk to wash down that spicy sausage!” I thought for a moment: he was right, the one thing that will help your mouth recover from spiciness (capsaicin in particular) is milk. Intrigued, I started chatting.

It went something like this:

Me: “I don’t like to drink milk.”
Him: “You haven’t had milk like this.”
Me: *dubious*
Him: “No, really. Try it.”

He explained to me that the milk we have today isn’t like the milk from 40 years ago. Instead of grocery stores having relationships with farmers, they have relationships with large companies that blend the milk from many, many cows together and homogenize it (which distributes the fat evenly within the milk, instead of allowing it to separate as cream). The cow’s diet has changed: instead of naturally grazing on grass, they eat grain.  Its environment is no longer the idyllic, rolling pasture we imagine when we think of cows, but instead factories with concrete.  The high temperature pasteurization process doesn’t add any flavor; instead, it disintegrates any that might be left.   Milk that’s in the dairy aisle has often taken a long road to get there, and the shelf life is much longer than it used to be. “Better living through science” is not always the best.

The milk was from Snowville Creamery, which is located out near Ohio University, and they say they make “Milk the Way it Used to Be”. The milk I had on Saturday was in the cow on Thursday, and expired a week and a day after we purchased it, giving it a ten day shelf life based on when the cow was milked.  The cows are grass fed, which means the milk actually has flavor (much like grass-fed beef). They use the lowest temperature legally possible so that the milk keeps that flavor.

This milk was a revelation.

I called Terry over, and he tried a sample of the whole milk.  He made me try some, too (again: brainwashed to think whole milk is bad for me).  I took a sip– it was rich, a little buttery, and really quite good.  It didn’t have a weird plastic smell (which I find even in paper-packaged milk).  I actually… liked it.  Am I going to start drinking gallons of whole milk? Probably not.  But am I going to change my milk-buying habits?  Yes.

Terry agreed– and bought a half-gallon on the spot.  He agreed that it tasted like the milk he drank as a kid.  I want to try their cream as well.  Ooh, and cottage cheese made from Snowville milk?  Yum.

Snowville Creamery’s milk is a bit more expensive than what you’d get at Kroger’s– about $3 for a half-gallon, which is what we purchased.  Is it worth it?  Oh, yeah.



17 thoughts on “Thoughts about Food: Milk”

  • Thank you. I will head over there when I get home from my trip. I try to buy the organic milk with DHA for Michael and it does have a much better flavor than what one would get in the plastic gallon jug. I wonder, does this milk you speak of come in a plastic or paper carton? I think that it should be in the paper carton so that the light does not break down the properties; however, I could be wrong.

    Also, have you bought grass fed beef? Where? And, we missed you today!
    .-= Christina Baita´s last blog ..5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance =-.

  • Ohh! Snowville’s milk is great! We bought it quite a lot before we moved. We’ll have to check for something similar in TN. We’ve been buying some great local brown eggs since we moved, and I had to giggle when I picked some up at Whole Foods one day, and a guy said, “Those are our eggs!” — the two farmers were demonstrating, making freshly scrambled eggs. Glad you tried the milk!

  • Funny you mention this as someone at work was just telling me about this milk earlier this week. Apparently she got hooked by trying a sample at bigg’s. I don’t like to drink milk (never have) for exactly the reasons listed above. I might actually try this to see for myself, although I’m still not sure I can bring myself to actually drink milk.
    .-= suz´s last blog ..Otter Days at Monterey Bay Aquarium =-.

  • Funny you mention this as someone at work was just telling me about this milk earlier this week. Apparently she got hooked by trying a sample at bigg’s. I don’t like to drink milk (never have) for exactly the reasons listed above. I might actually try this to see for myself, although I’m still not sure I can bring myself to actually drink milk.
    .-= suz´s last blog ..Otter Days at Monterey Bay Aquarium =-.
    Oops…forgot to say great post! Looking forward to your next one.

  • I’ve tried this milk, but only one carton of it. But when I found out they pasteurize their milk only at the “lowest temperature legally possible,” it made me nervous. Here’s why:

    There are a couple people I know who suffer from Crohn’s Disease. Their doctors and scientists have speculated that, at least in their cases, the cause was from an organism commonly found in milk called mycobaterium paratuberculosis.

    This organism frequently survives pasteurization at low temperatures. It is thought the pasteurization process itself is to blame, since more pathogens have now become resistant to higher temperatures. So it may not be a good thing that these farms continue the low temperature process.

    The following article indicates that much of this bacteria gets passed on from cows to humans in milk when standard pasteurization methods are used:

    http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/62/2/631

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/9702523/Crohns-Disease-Caused-by-Bacteria-in-Milk-from-sick-cows

    • Thanks for responding with this comment and the information. I will check it out for my own blog’s research. I thought that you may also want to know that Chron’s disease is also thought to be possibly caused by Gluten, the protein found in wheat.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten_sensitivity
      http://www.nutrihealth.org/pages/crohns.html

      The protein in dairy (casein) can also affect the body and cause/affect Chron’s. That could also be one reason for the milk issue. If the symptoms are still present with your friends it may be wise for them to be tested for a gluten intolerance and/or even delete it from their diet to see if they begin to feel better.I have read books where the gut has healed itself after removing the gluten from the diet.

      Regarding the pasteurization methods, there are other cultures that drink cow/goat/camel milk straight from the animal with no pasteurization at all and are quite healthy.The largest benefits of the dairy are completely removed during the heating process, which may be one reason why they use the methods they do.

      These animals are raised in a more natural and organic state than the ones that are crammed into a cemented animal factory, where the only true desire is profit. When the animals are walking and eating in their own feces, there is a greater chance of disease, not to say that this is why your friends became ill. For all I know with the information given, they could have raised the cows themselves. It’s all a chance unless you do raise and grow your own food and even then, who knows.

      Good luck to them and thanks again for the information!
      .-= Christina Baita´s last blog ..5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance =-.

  • I think I know the brand you are talking about. J loved getting it when we could still shop at Whole Foods. I hate milk too but know that attitude is bad b/c of the benefits of calcium. My dad worked for a dairy too but I still hated it. Maybe I should be adventurous and try something fresher. There is a lot of fresh, local milk here in upstate.

  • Julie, sometimes I think you read my mind LOL As soon as I started reading I thought, I bet she’s found Snowville! My mom & I chatted & sampled with the Snowville Creamery guys at Biggs in Mason and although it was good, she usually sticks to the plastic gallon jugs. Yesterday at Biggs in Hyde Park I finally decided to buy a half gallon… and I LOVE IT! But I am a milk drinker… glad you’ve found some you like, too 🙂

  • i read your blog post right before i left to go grocery shopping. i went to biggs and found this milk and thought i’d give it a try. i just had some cereal with it and it was pretty good. you are correct- it has a buttery taste. the real test will be when i make a cappuccino with it. that’s how i drink milk the most.
    .-= D R E W´s last blog ..etsycincinnati: under the sun =-.

  • We have been buying that milk for about 2 months now. Mostly my husband uses it–I am not a milk person, really, but he has cereal every morning and a glass or two per day just to drink. We buy it because of its environmental bennies.
    Glad you are spreading the word!
    Pama Mitchell (www.healthyfoodies.blogspot.com)
    .-= Pama´s last blog ..Sexy summer pizza — healthy and delicious =-.

  • I second Liz’s comment about using the cream for butter. Snowville creamery is now the only cream we use when making butter. It is absolutely luxurious.
    .-= Jess´s last blog ..The Palace =-.

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